Do No Harm: How Safe Access Could Eliminate Racial Disparity in Drug Policy Enforcement

By Ryan Reaves, MPP Candidate 2018   Interacting with police can, at times, mean the difference between life and death. For cannabis users, whose lives have often necessitated regular involvement in illicit activities, police interactions likely occur more frequently. The risk may be greater still for drug users of color who live in communities disproportionately … Continue reading Do No Harm: How Safe Access Could Eliminate Racial Disparity in Drug Policy Enforcement

Say Her Name: How You Can Support Justice for Kayla Moore

By Noah Gaiser, MPP Candidate 2019 Editor’s Note: This article contains a discussion of police violence and judicial indifference against an intersectional person of color. Reader discretion is advised.  Two weeks ago I found myself standing in silence outside Berkeley City Hall, head bowed, listening to Kayla Moore’s life story as told by her sister … Continue reading Say Her Name: How You Can Support Justice for Kayla Moore

AB 109 – Are State Inmates Really Better Off in County Jails?

By Miguel Dwin, MPP Candidate 2018 Prior to 2011, individuals convicted of a felony offense resulting in a sentence of more than one year would serve time in state prison. The state prison term was followed by an additional period on state parole supervision under the state Division of Adult Parole Operations (DAPO). However, under … Continue reading AB 109 – Are State Inmates Really Better Off in County Jails?

A Matter of Trust: Community Policing in the Era of Trump

By Molly Curley O’Brien , MBA/MPP candidate 2019 At the Republican Convention in July, President Donald Trump declared that “on January 20th, 2017, safety will be restored.” On President Trump’s 100th day in office, his safety restoration project has a long way to go.  Flanked by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Trump is pushing a new … Continue reading A Matter of Trust: Community Policing in the Era of Trump

“When Police Kill, Should They Judge Themselves?”

By Zoe Harris, MPP Candidate 2017 For nearly a decade, Wisconsin drivers faced billboards with the nozzle of a gun and the text, “When police kill, should they judge themselves?” The campaign was headed by Michael Bell, whose unarmed son was killed by police in Kenosha, Wisconsin. After the shooting, the Kenosha Police Department’s detective … Continue reading “When Police Kill, Should They Judge Themselves?”

California’s Bail System: Reform or Abolish? (Part 2)

By Rebecca Wegley, MPP Candidate 2017 Originally published by the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice, August 2016 The U.S. Department of Justice recently stated that holding people in jail simply because they cannot afford to post bail violates their Fourteenth Amendment rights under the US Constitution. In an amicus brief, Justice Department attorneys called for … Continue reading California’s Bail System: Reform or Abolish? (Part 2)

California’s Bail System: Reform or Abolish? (Part 1)

By Rebecca Wegley, MPP Candidate 2017 Originally published by the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice (CJCJ), August 2016 On any given day in the United States, there are approximately 450,000 unsentenced people in jails awaiting trial or sentencing. In 2015, California alone accounted for about 10 percent of that figure, with 45,000 unsentenced people … Continue reading California’s Bail System: Reform or Abolish? (Part 1)

Harnessing County Level Prop 47 Savings

By Rebecca Wegley, MPP Candidate 2017 Originally published by the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice (CJCJ), June 2016 Proposition 47, the Safe Neighborhood and Schools Act, passed by California voters in November 2014, effectively reduced the status of several low-level property and drug offenses from felonies to misdemeanors. While Prop 47 mandates that state … Continue reading Harnessing County Level Prop 47 Savings