California’s Bail System: Reform or Abolish? (Part 1)

By Rebecca Wegley, MPP Candidate 2017 Originally published by the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice (CJCJ), August 2016 On any given day in the United States, there are approximately 450,000 unsentenced people in jails awaiting trial or sentencing. In 2015, California alone accounted for about 10 percent of that figure, with 45,000 unsentenced people … Continue reading California’s Bail System: Reform or Abolish? (Part 1)

Harnessing County Level Prop 47 Savings

By Rebecca Wegley, MPP Candidate 2017 Originally published by the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice (CJCJ), June 2016 Proposition 47, the Safe Neighborhood and Schools Act, passed by California voters in November 2014, effectively reduced the status of several low-level property and drug offenses from felonies to misdemeanors. While Prop 47 mandates that state … Continue reading Harnessing County Level Prop 47 Savings

Political Cartoons To “Ted Cruz is the Zodiac Killer”: Past, Present, and Future of Political Satire

By Alysa Cisneros, Senior Editor, MPP Candidate 2017 Political satire has had a substantial effect on politics. Most importantly, satire has the power to direct how the public cognizes political news and shift policy agendas and focus. Satirical mediums change along with prevalent forms of media. From lithographs, newspapers, and broadcast journalism to the Internet, … Continue reading Political Cartoons To “Ted Cruz is the Zodiac Killer”: Past, Present, and Future of Political Satire

The Case For An Equitable Sharing Economy

By Mia Satya, BA Public Policy expected 2016  One of the most hotly debated ballot propositions of 2015 pitted Airbnb hosts and lobbyists against affordable housing groups and displaced residents. San Francisco’s Proposition F would have capped private short-term rentals 75 nights a year and strengthened enforcement mechanisms. What got considerable flack from the opposition … Continue reading The Case For An Equitable Sharing Economy

Adding Injury to Injury: Drug Policy Hurts the Sick and Vulnerable and Fails to Address Intended Problem

By J. Westly McGaughey, MBA/MPP candidate 2016 On 3 November 2015, Ireland’s National Drug Strategy Chief announced that the country will decriminalize small amounts of illicit drugs for personal use[1].  The move is intended to help addicts rather than jail them.  This is a prudent policy.  In contrast, the U.S. supports policies that go against the … Continue reading Adding Injury to Injury: Drug Policy Hurts the Sick and Vulnerable and Fails to Address Intended Problem

African American Adolescent Males: Living Stressfully in Alameda County

  By Sharon Robinson, MPP 2015 “Being male and black in Oakland means being about as likely to be killed as to graduate from high school ready for college. “ —Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle African American adolescent males are affected by physical and emotional stressors that include “adverse experiences such as racism, poverty, incarceration, … Continue reading African American Adolescent Males: Living Stressfully in Alameda County

Oakland Chinatown – Displacement Vulnerability and the Ethnic Economic Enclave

By Beki McElvain, Founding Editor, BA Public Policy 2014 Low-income immigrant enclaves are particularly susceptible to displacement as a result of transportation-oriented development (TOD) projects in their urban neighborhoods. Too often, economic revival projects have failed to recognize this risk, despite steps taken within the planning process to promote equitable development.  The relationship between redevelopment … Continue reading Oakland Chinatown – Displacement Vulnerability and the Ethnic Economic Enclave